The MomFair
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Why TheMomFair?

Why TheMomFair?

Because  “opting back in” isn’t easy. Returning to the workforce after a period of absence is difficult for anyone. But for Moms its particularly difficult because, even when you have a helpful and supportive spouse, or a great support team (sitters, friends and family), the fact remains that Moms still need some amount of flexibility in their schedule to be available to their families.

And there’s no easy solution.  Every Mom’s situation is different. We don’t propose to have the answers. But at least we can create a resource where Moms can search for specific solutions – recruiters, career coaches, work from home (direct sales) and franchise opportunities, business services, family planning, childcare and other help. We just want to get the information in front of you, so you have access to the resources who can help you solve your particular need.

What’s everyone else saying about career moms….

nytLogoSince 2007, the Pace University School of Law in White Plains has been running a program aimed at helping lawyers who had left the field — typically stay-at-home mothers — re-enter the legal profession. Called New Directions, the course consists of 11 weeks of classroom refresher training and then an 11-week internship working as a lawyer in any of a number of settings, including law firms, government and nonprofit agencies and corporate offices. Pace offers two sessions a year, typically of 12 to 18 lawyers each. About 95 percent are women, and the average age is about 50. READ MORE…

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2013 POWER SURVEY  Herewith, a surprisingly positive, occasionally infuriating survey on what women and men think about leaning in, having a life, scoring a raise, speaking up, and being the boss—and what we can do to make sure our daughters live in a world where glass ceilings are just those things you put up to get some light  READ MORE

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…This magazine, in a cover article by Lisa Belkin, called the phenomenon of their leaving work the “Opt-Out Revolution,” and other coverage followed: a Time magazine cover story on “The Case for Staying Home” and a “60 Minutes” segment devoted to a group of former mega-achievers who were, as the anchor Lesley Stahl put it, “giving up money, success and big futures” to be home with their children. READ MORE…

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Today Moms“I have real remorse.” So confesses Lisa Endlich Heffernan, a former Wall Street trader who has struck a chord with women everywhere, after an honest assessment of how her decision to become a SAHM – a stay-at-home mom – almost 20 years ago has impacted her life and career. “At no point did I calculate the lifetime impact of diminished earnings and prospects,” Heffernan wrote in a recent column for the Huffington Post READ MORE…

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iVillage-LogoLet’s face it: the choice to “opt out” is an option for very few of us, especially in this economic climate. But should you find yourself, despite financial circumstances that make it an impossibility, dreaming about a simple life of domestic bliss with your children at home, The New York Times has a message for you: It’s not all a bed of roses. READ MORE…

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pink bookOpting In and Out, How to Create the Best of Both Worlds for Working Moms - There’s a generation of middle-aged women returning to the workforce – some bitterly. Why? Years ago, they “opted out” to stay home with their children. Now, they are looking to return – only to be offered fractions of their former salaries and little to no prestige. Mayanne Downs, city attorney for the City of Orlando and shareholder at GrayRobinson law firm, knows why these women opted out and is doing her best to make sure the women at her firm aren’t pressured to do the same. READ MORE…

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nytLogoIt’s a lesson that comes through loud and clear in Sheryl Sandberg’s new book, “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.” Her point, in a nutshell, is that notwithstanding the many gender biases that still operate all over the workplace, excuses and justifications won’t get women anywhere. Instead, believe in yourself, give it your all, “lean in” and “don’t leave before you leave” — which is to say, don’t doubt your ability to combine work and family and thus edge yourself out of plum assignments before you even have a baby. READ MORE…

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cnn-parentsThe women who opted out helped pave the way for much of the flexibility in the workforce that we see today, she told me at a Greenwich Village café. Belkin remembered a law partner who once told her his business invested $100,000 in training and time for every attorney employed by the firm, a losing investment when moms opt out. “That’s $100,00 walking out the door,” he told her. So businesses like his decided to figure out how to keep them through job flexibility and leave policies. READ MORE…

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AtlanticI read Lean In expecting a manifesto for my generation. Instead, I found myself in a statistic on the bottom of page 98. “43% of highly qualified women with children are leaving careers or off-ramping for a period of time.” This is me. I am the 43 percent. For those of us who left the traditional workforce to raise their kids with full intention of returning to the workplace, Sheryl Sandberg provides no advice or strategies for re-entry. MORE….